It didn't take long for Internet to explode in fury after Judge Aaron Perksy sentenced 'The Stanford Rapist' Brock turner to only six months in jail. The anger over an inappropriately mitigated sentence was then compounded by Turner's victim's powerful and heartbreaking letter in which she described, in excruciating detail, the trauma she'd experienced over the past year. Letters scolding Turner and his sympathizers flooded the Internet and outraged survivors called for Persky's removal. Now, it looks like all the protesting may finally pay off, and the California judge will be facing the consequences of his recent decisions. 


In protest, jurors were refusing to serve on any of the California judge's court cases. And now Persky's been removed from an upcoming sexual assault case. 

aaron perskyjason doiy / AP

In the upcoming sexual assault case, a San Jose nurse allegedly raped an unconscious, anesthetized patient. Hmmm, disturbingly familiar circumstances, right? The prosecution, in a rare move, filed a motion to remove Persky from the case. This "papering" motion comes in the wake of jurors' refusal to serve in his courtroom and Persky tossing out a misdemeanor theft trial before it could reach a jury.


Technically, according to District Attorney Jeff Rosen, Perky was removed due to his dismissal of the misdemeanor.

However, Rosen was pretty clear that Persky's less-than-stellar record in the past few months was also to blame. The D.A. delivered a prepared statement, saying:

"We are disappointed and puzzled at Judge Persky's unusual decision to unilaterally dismiss a case before the jury could deliberate. After this and the recent turn of events, we lack confidence that Judge Persky can fairly participate in this upcoming hearing in which a male nurse sexually assaulted an anesthetized female patient."

Yeah, we're all "lacking confidence" that he can treat any sexual assault case with the consideration it deserves. 


It's still unclear whether Perky will be removed from all sexual assault cases that he may be assigned in the future. 

...Fingers crossed.