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Conservatives Ignorantly Ask Where Obama Was During Hurricane Katrina—It Backfired Perfectly

When it comes to historical events that happened centuries ago, it's easy to get dates mixed up because those time periods weren't exactly relevant to you. Nor did you live through them.

However, if you're mixing up major historical events that had occurred in the last few, let's say, Presidential terms, there's really no excuse to confuse them.

In the case of some die-hard Obama haters, people pulling at straws to criticize other politicians so the people they support don't look so gosh-darn awful by comparison, also known as a straw-man argument. However, this particular straw-man had some overzealous conservatives respond to criticism of President Trump's response to Hurricane Harvey by claiming Obama was playing golf while in office during Hurricane Katrina.

There's just one problem: Obama wasn't in office during Hurricane Katrina. That's because Katrina happened in 2005 and Obama was, you know, like, kinda elected and made history as the first black President in 2008, and wasn't sworn into office until 2009.

What's even worse, for conservatives who actually believe Obama did nothing during Katrina as President, is that even though he wasn't in the oval office, as a Senator in Illinois Obama went out to Houston, Texas to meet with Katrina evacuees who had escaped Louisiana. He also spoke about the Federal government's poor response to the Hurricane in a visit to Harvard.

Why is this so troubling? Because there are social media accounts, many of them bots, that constantly send out misinformation; misinformation that may have played a huge part in Trump getting elected, misinformation that led 29% of Louisiana residents in 2013 to blame Barack Obama for the poor response to the Hurricane that devastated their state. 

It's kind of ironic that Donald Trump is potentially benefiting from the spread of this misinformation as he's been quick to shout "fake news."

The prevalence of bots and their impact on elections, like the 2016 one is undeniable. Three months before the election the top 20 fake election stories had more engagement on Facebook than the top 20 real ones. Which means that people are basing their decisions on a bunch of misinformation, or are just actively clicking on things to further their own confirmation bias. 

Don't think that actual fake news and misinformation is a threat? Just ask the overwhelming number of people who thought (and some still think) that Hillary Clinton ran a child sex-trafficking ring from a pizza shop. Let that sink in. To make matters worse, the "reports" claimed she was doing it out of the pizzeria's basement, but reportedly, it doesn't even have a basement. The fact that these ridiculous claims spread like wildfire on the web proves that, one, human beings are the worst, and two, fake news is a very, real, real problem.

How do you feel that obvious things like the years Obama served as President need to be fact-checked?

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