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Activists Accuse Paul Ryan Of Being A Hypocrite For 'Autism Awareness' Tweet

In my opinion, the GOP's healthcare proposal plan was an utter failure. Some proponents of the act are saying that the Republican Party's lack of time to adequately prepare for an alternative is to blame, but when you consider that Ryan and Co. have been trying to repeal Obamacare before it was even voted on, it's hard to believe that that was the case.

Politics by nature is a very hypocritical game. Obama was painted as a caring liberal, but ended up dropping more bombs on people than any other President in recent history. It doesn't change the fact that he helped pioneer some social programs that helped a lot of Americans, but if you ask me, the dude was a war monger and sold tons of guns. In fact, many experts are saying he was better for the firearms industry than Trump.

Ever since Trump was elected President, there have been some pretty overt examples of hypocrisy in politics going on. Like when he tried tweeting an inspirational message on National Women's Day and gave a speech about the importance of cultivating strong female leadership in the US.

So when Paul Ryan tried tweeting about Autism Awareness a short while after his disastrous ACA-replacement act failed, people had a lot to say.

Mainly, "what the hell was he thinking?"

Twitter users were quick to point out that Ryan's nice tweet was just that: a "nice tweet." Many people feel that his career is all about taking aware healthcare and rights from citizens who need it most, like the autistic people he claims to care about. Never mind the fact that AHCA would likely pull funding from government programs that provide care for autistic citizens.

Some thought Ryan was joking.

Others pointed out how disastrous AHCA would have been for families with autistic children.

Others were a little more straight to the point.

You'd figure he'd have thought about the backlash before sending out the tweet, then again, this is the same man who thought holding a pint of poorly-poured Guinness in front of a bunch of Irish people was a good way to celebrate St. Patrick's Day.

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