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President Trump Just Got Caught Breaking Yet Another One Of His Campaign Promises

According to a report by McClatchy, a major construction company owned by the Chinese government has reportedly been hired to work on the latest Trump golf club development in Dubai, despite a pledge from Donald Trump that his family business would not engage in business with foreign governments. 

Trump’s partner, DAMAC Properties, awarded the $32 million contract to a Middle East subsidiary of the China State Construction Engineering Corporation (CSCEC). The company will now build a six-lane road for the Trump World Golf Club Dubai project called Akoya Oxygen, which is expected to open next year. 

According to Forbes, CSCEC is the 7th largest company in China and 37th worldwide, with almost $130 billion in revenue for 2014. 

A Trump Organization official told The Hill that the Chinese company was appointed by DAMAC, which licenses the right to use the Trump name and brand, "to undertake some infrastructure work and to build one of their hospitality developments." Adding that it was "totally unrelated" to the golf club. 

The Trump Organization had agreed not to engage in any new foreign deals with a foreign country, agency or official , other than “normal and customary arrangements” before President Trump’s election. But Trump refused to fully separate himself from his business interests, as Presidents have done in the past, instead putting his holdings in a trust designed to hold assets for his “exclusive benefit.” 

Meredith McGehee, chief of policy, programs, and strategy at Issue One, said the new deal poses several potential problems for a president. Including accusations that a foreign government is enriching him in return for goodwill, which would violate the Emoluments Clause of the U.S. Constitution. It states that government officials may not accept gifts, titles of nobility or emoluments from foreign governments with respect to their office, and that no benefit should be derived by holding office. 

The clause states that government officials may not accept gifts, titles of nobility or emoluments from foreign governments with respect to their office, and that no benefit should be derived by holding office.  

“This is not just a concern of good government organizations,” McGehee said. “It was a fundamental concern of the founding fathers.” 

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