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Deceased Hollywood Star's Sexual Harrassment Allegations From 1945 Re-Emerge Online

The fallout from Harvey Weinstein's innumerable sexual assault allegations has led to a powerful cultural movement. Women in every industry are drawing attention to their histories of sexual harassment and finally being given a microphone to call out instances of predatory behavior by powerful men.

While we're finally beginning to recognize the deeply pervasive nature of this type of abuse, especially in Hollywood, it's important to realize that it has always been present. Though we've at last begun to call it out, women have been sexually mistreated by their professional superiors for as long as they've been a part of the workforce.

Recently, this unearthed allegation from 1945 by actress Maureen O'Hara has gone viral:

Sadly, her words still resonate today...

I'm a helpless victim of a Hollywood whispering campaign. Because I don't let the producer and director kiss me every morning or let them paw me they have spread around town that I am not a woman, that I am a cold piece of marble statuary.
...
I am so upset with it that I am ready to quit Hollywood. It's got so bad I hate to come to work in the morning.

In 2014, before her death, O'Hara spoke to The Daily Telegraph about how refusing to give in to advances from studio heads harmed her career:

I wouldn't throw myself on the casting couch, and I know that cost me parts. I wasn't going to play the wh***. That wasn't me.

O'Hara is best remembered for her roles in How Green Was My Valley (1941), Miracle on 34th Street (1947), and The Quiet Man (1952). In the last of those roles, opposite John Wayne, many thought she should have been nominated for an Academy Award, but she believes director John Ford, who was obsessed with her in an unhealthy fashion (even going so far as to break into her home and go through her belongings), waged a behind-closed-doors war to deny her a nomination.

Twitter stood in solidarity with O'Hara...

E.B. is torn:

Some on Twitter shared stories from their own relatives...

Perhaps there's a lesson here:

H/T - Indy 100, The Telegraph, Twitter

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