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Source: E!

'Botched' Doctors Terry Dubrow and Paul Nassif on the Coronavirus (EXCLUSIVE)

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For nearly six years on Botched, doctors Terry Dubrow and Paul Nassif have been operating on patients who have received unreal plastic surgery procedures in the past. Some viewers tune in to see the drastic differences from the patients before and after their Botched operations, while others watch the show to see Paul and Terry's dynamic friendship — which includes a lot of poking fun. 

Each season, the doctors take on more intense and seemingly impossible cases, as the patients are desperate to get some relief from the bad surgery they received elsewhere. The second part of Season 6 is slated to return on E! on April 13, and the surgeons have insisted that the stakes have never been higher.

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Source: Instagram

In an exclusive interview with Distractify, the Botched doctors discussed how their practices have been affected by the coronavirus, and the ways in which they're using their resources and influence to help those in need

Dr. Dubrow from 'Botched' offered his surgery center to hospitals during the coronavirus.

While much of the United States is on lockdown to help flatten the curve during the coronavirus pandemic, many states have also mandated that all elective surgery procedures be postponed until the crisis has come to an end. Though Drs. Dubrow and Nassif are oftentimes doing life-changing surgery on their patients, the two have stopped operating for the time being. 

"I was operating until the last day I could because it’s not like we have regular plastic surgery practices," Dr. Dubrow exclusively told Distractify. "It's almost like our patients have diseases, and it's somewhat like an essential plastic surgery that our patients need."

When Dr. Dubrow did stop operating, he offered all of his resources to local hospitals in the Southern California area. 

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Source: Getty

"We made our masks and our ventilators available to our local hospitals," he continued. "I called the chief of my hospital, and I said, 'You can have my surgery center, you can have whatever you need.'"

Without operating, Dr. Dubrow has freed up his schedule — and he's been getting a lot of quality time in with his wife, RHOC alum Heather Dubrow and their four children, Max, Katarina, Nicholas, and Collette. Of course, Dr. Dubrow couldn't shy away from his signature sarcasm when it came to discussing this added time with his family. 

"Being at home has been a little bit weird, because I’m usually so busy and now I realize 'Hey, I have children. Who knew?' And they’re slightly amusing. The first part of this has been reconnecting with my family, and there’s been a good component about it."

Dr. Dubrow went on to discuss what it's been like to be a medical professional throughout this ordeal, and how he thinks the coronavirus will escalate as time goes on. He stressed the importance of masks. 

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Source: Getty

"Dr. Mehmet Oz is a friend of mine, and along with Dr. Fauci, he's been one of the major voices of this. I’ve been really concerned with what’s going on in New York because it’s the hotspot. It’s directing how the things we’re doing are affecting the rest of the country," Dr. Dubrow said. "I know the CDC is saying that you don’t necessarily need to be wearing masks — but we all need to wear masks. It’s going to be about five seconds before they say that." 

Dr. Nassif from 'Botched' partnered with L.A. Made to distribute cloth masks.

Dr. Nassif agreed with his Botched co-star about the importance of wearing masks, and he detailed his partnership with L.A. Made for The Mask Movement. L.A. Made is a clothing company that is creating non-medical-grade face masks that people can use outside of hospitals, or that can be worn under medical ones to extend their longevity. The masks are reusable and washable, and they will assist during the mask shortage that is facing the U.S. 

For every two masks that are purchased on TheMaskMovement.com, another is donated by one of the organization's partners. The donated masks are going to either Loma Linda University Medical Center in Southern California, or NYU Langone Health in New York City. 

In addition to Dr. Nassif's partnership, he's also diligently working on getting N95 masks to the United States in a timely fashion. 

"I’ve been dealing with China and four different distributors, because I’m connected with a few of them here, to get the N95 masks for the healthcare workers," he said.

Dr. Nassif explained that, because supplies are so low, the prices of these N95 masks are often skyrocketing. 

"The prices are escalating and there’s price gouging," he said. "I'm trying to get these deals for three Southern California hospital systems to get them the masks, but for good prices. I'm working with the main supply people for each hospital for that. That’s something I didn’t originally get into, but I found out that I had connections for it." 

While the two doctors are doing their part to use their platforms and their resources to give back during the coronavirus pandemic, they've definitely not forgotten about ribbing one another. Though they're unable to film together at the moment or see each other in person, Dr. Dubrow couldn't shy away from making fun of his co-star. 

He may be enjoying getting reacquainted with his family during quarantine, but he said that Dr. Nassif's wife of nearly one year, Brittany Pattakos, isn't as lucky. 

"Just feel sorry for Brittany, because Paul’s home all day. Can you imagine?" Dr. Dubrow joked. 

Botched premieres on Monday, April 13, at 9 p.m. on E! 

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