This Is What the Families on ‘Holmes Family Rescue’ Have to Pay For Repairs

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Dec. 5 2021, Published 9:35 a.m. ET

If anyone ever tries to argue that our species isn't obsessed with nesting, simply point them to the staggering popularity of HGTV programming. People just love to see folks repair their homes, either by themselves or with the help of professionals. From watching realtors scope out perfect new abodes, to seeing massive renovations of existing properties, we just love home improvement, and the presumption that someone else will foot the bill for it. We know this isn't exactly the case with all shows, but does Holmes Family Rescue pay for repairs?

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Does 'Holmes Family Rescue' pay for repairs?

If you aren't familiar with the program, the title of it gives a pretty good summary. The show follows contractor Mike Holmes as he visits family homes that are in dire need of repair. One of the biggest recurring themes throughout nearly all episodes is the homeowner's dissatisfaction with work previous contractors performed on their house.

Mike swoops in to fix previous mistakes, making him a guardian angel of sorts, a moniker that's closely associated with his name if you search who he is online. As her his website: "Michael James Holmes is a Canadian builder/contractor, businessman, investor, television host, and philanthropist. In his first television series, Holmes on Homes, he rescues homeowners from renovations gone wrong."

But how much truth is there to his "philanthropist" moniker?

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As it turns out, quite a lot. According to the show's Wikipedia page, clients are only expected to foot 10%-20% of the repair costs, with Mike either personally donating his own money (not to mention knowledge and effort) to rescuing a family's home.

What's more is that many other contractors on the series either donated their skilled labor, building materials, or consulting know-how to help give folks the home of their dreams.

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Mike Holmes works with his own children to complete the fixes.

The series is a family affair in more ways than one: not only is Mike Holmes assisting families, he's involving his own kids in the process of righting the contracting wrongs of previous workers in the houses featured on the show.

Source: Twitter | @Make_It_Right
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What's more is that his philanthropic efforts aren't just reserved for camera time, either. Mike established The Holmes Foundation, which helps to collect and allocate funds to assist people who've been victims of poor workmanship.

It's no secret that he gets extremely blunt when assessing at the shoddy work of other professional contractors.

In fact, "that's not up to code" can even be considered the show's official recurring chorus line. In an interview with the Chicago Tribune, Mike expressed strong thoughts on the idea of a "minimum code" and the long-term, deleterious effects contractors inflict on homes by simply fulfilling the lowest common denominator.

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Source: Twitter | @Make_It_Right

"We seem to have a lot of problems with foundations because we're building to minimal codes, and with floors that seem to get weaker and weaker every year. Builders need to build with better products, beyond minimum code — and they need to promote it, brag about it."

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In another interview with AZ Central, Holmes also stressed the importance of house hunters to do their homework before plunging down on a property, urging buyers to use "intelligence" rather than "illusion" when making their decision.

Source: Twitter | @Make_It_Right

He also stated that before even looking at houses, home seekers should first secure a great real estate agent and home inspector with plenty of experience first.

If he sounds like the kind of guy you want to help fulfill your nesting fix, you can check out new episodes of Holmes Family Rescue on HGTV Saturdays at 7 PM EST.

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