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Source: getty

Green Day Just Released an Instruction Manual for Rebellion Women and People Are Confused

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Green Day — as in the band Green Day — just announced their collaboration with graphic artist Frank Caruso (Popeye, Betty Boop) on a "handbook" of sorts for rebellious women called Last of the American Girls. And people's reactions to the book are divided.

Being an advocate for women's rights at a man, especially today, is a delicate matter. Your ability to empathize with women can only go so far and it's tricky at best for men to try to act as a "voice" for women.


Lots of modern shows have tackled the topic. New Girl and Younger commented on the male feminist phenomenon in their respective ways, and it's a frequent topic of debate on the internet. Dudes who are overly zealous in apologizing for their "man-ness" are ridiculed either for: 1) acting like "white knights" just to get laid;  2) being submissive "cucks"; or 3) not really understanding where women are coming from. 

Speaking from personal experience, as much as I love and care about my wife, I can't really understand what it was like growing up as a woman in our tight-knit community and the judgmental backlash she received and continues to receive for deciding she didn't want to wear a headscarf anymore.

For the most part, I let her handle whatever awkward social/familial interactions that may arise if someone brings it up, because she's made it clear she doesn't want me to intervene or talk about that issue.

Similarly, I'm not gonna go out of my way and try to be the voice of anti-hijab-shaming, because, as a man, that isn't my lane.