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Source: iStock Photo / Twitter

Woman Shuts Down Creepy Dude Who Sent Her an Unsolicited Pic with Brilliant Response

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Dudes who send women unsolicited inappropriate pictures should not get away scot-free with their gross behavior. And so when one woman received an unsolicited pic (even after explicitly asking him not to), she came up with a very creative way to respond and get back at him at the same time.

All she had to do was pretend to write an "automated message" from Twitter that informed the dude that he was going to be reported to the police. He wasn't actually; she wrote the message herself. But she made it look super professional, and he fell for it instantly.

Even after she told him — very politely, I might add — that she did not want to receive a picture of his junk, he sent it. So she simply wrote back with this: "This is an automated message generated by the Twitter team. Your image has been found to be a violation of 42 U.S.C. § 1283 (2020).

"An image you sent has been scanned by our AI Bot and was flagged as an unsolicited picture. Your account is scheduled to be reported to the police. Our bot is currently in BETA testing; sometimes it makes mistakes. If you believe this message was in error, reply 'HELP.' Otherwise, you will be contacted by your local authorities within 24hrs."

Is this genius or is this genius? @FruityNesa's tweet went completely viral, racking up more than 117,000 retweets and nearly 800,000 likes and giving lots of women on the internet a way to mess with the gross dudes who invade their DMs.

But she is not the first person to make creepy guys regret their disgusting behavior. A few months ago, Jenn Tisdale convinced a man that his inappropriate image wasn't coming through because she had an app that blocked pictures and immediately sent them to the police.

If lying (even to gross guys) isn't your speed, there are numerous other methods women have devised to either get back at dudes who send them unsolicited pictures or even stop them from sending them in the first place. You can, as Madi Kohn did, warn that you will send any unsolicited pics to the offender's mom, and then actually make good on that promise.

If you are a woman or a female-presenting person who lives in a metropolitan area and often find yourself using public transportation, you might have experienced the unsolicited pic from AirDrop, a function Apple clearly didn't think out fully before they released it into the world.

One woman who's experienced this extreme violation of privacy, Kelly Gardner, decided to combat it by changing her iPhone's name to "John's work iPhone." She thought it might have been the feminine nature of her name that made men feel like they could get away with sending unsolicited pictures. And she was right.

When she changed it, "the dick pics stopped immediately," she told The Huffington Post. When she told her female friends about what she'd done, several others copied her and did the same. 

Whether you write fake messages, send the pictures to their moms, change you phone's name, or sell buttons of the pics to make money, one thing is certain. It's exhausting to be a woman. We shouldn't have to come up with clever ways to handle unsolicited pics. There should be no unsolicited pics at all. 

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