Secret voices on 'I Can See Your Voice'
Source: Fox

The Number of Good Singers on 'I Can See Your Voice' Varies by Episode

Allison DeGrushe - Author
By

Feb. 2 2022, Published 6:10 p.m. ET

As of late, Fox has stepped up their reality television game with the second season of I Can See Your Voice. The game show, which features Adrienne Bailon-Houghton and Cheryl Hines as the permanent panelists, as well as Ken Jeong as the host, challenges a rotating panel of celebrity music fanatics to help a contestant determine whether mystery singers are talented.

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It seems simple enough, but there's a catch — the contestant doesn't get the chance to hear the vocalists sing a single note of the song. So, how can they tell which singers are skilled and which ones aren't? Wait, how many good singers are there in an episode? Are there a lot? Or does the atrocity outweigh the gifted? Let's find out!

Ken Jeong during the Season 2 finale of 'I Can See Your Voice.'
Source: Fox
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How many good singers are there on 'I Can See Your Voice'?

Each week, I Can See Your Voice introduces six secret voices; however, the number of good singers varies per episode.

The Season 2 premiere included five good singers and one poor singer. Because the contestant is tasked with identifying the good singers, this presented contestant Millicent Fynn with a higher chance of winning the jackpot prize of $100,000. (In fact, she walked away with that amount!)

In Episode 2, things got more challenging for contestant, Jacquelyn Thomas. Out of the six secret voices, only two were considered good singers, making the probability of winning the jackpot lower. As a result, she chose to walk away at the end of the game with her previous $60,000 earnings, which was certainly better than continuing to guess, getting it wrong, and going home with nothing.

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A singer on 'I Can See Your Voice.'
Source: Fox

As for the third episode, contestant Zac Feiden had an even worse time since only one secret voice was good. Sadly, he risked his previous earnings at the end of the game and walked away empty-handed.

Episode 4, which premiered on Jan. 26, 2022, offered a 50/50 split — three secret voices were good singers, and the other three weren't. By correctly identifying the last singer as talented, the participant, Kenny Sohn, won the $100,000 grand prize.

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How do contestants determine between a good and bad singer?

The contestants have no way of actually knowing whether one of the secret voices is good or not — they have to go with their gut and base their decision off of clues presented in each round.

A hockey player performs as a mystery singer on 'I Can See Your Voice.'
Source: Fox
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The first round consists of a lip-sync showdown, in which a pair of mystery singers face-off against each other. The second season of I Can See Your Voice introduced a "Golden Mic" lifeline, allowing the contestant to hear additional clues and direct comments from the guest musical superstar.

The next round, best known as "Super Fan," presents the contestant and celebrity guest with a video package conveying a superfan who's obsessed with one of the remaining mystery singers. While good singers have authentic content, bad singers have fake evidence.

Finally, the interrogation round approaches. In this final stage, the celebrity guest and contestant have 30 seconds each to question one of the remaining mystery singers before making their final decision. Yet again, the good singers speak the truth while the bad ones fabricate their stories to convince everyone that they can sing.

I Can Hear Your Voice airs on Wednesdays at 9 p.m. on FOX.

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