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Bloody Cartoon Shows The Unfortunate And Unsettling Truth About Gun Violence In America

A man named Devin Patrick Kelley shot and killed 26 people in the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas this weekend. This follows very soon after the murder of over 50 people at a concert in Las Vegas at the hands of yet another white man with an astounding arsenal of guns.

Some people cling desperately to their guns after a mass shooting, bleating about the 2nd Amendment. But enough people want change, and it's possible that lawmakers could make a difference. There's just one thing in the way: money. The NRA pays enormous amounts to legislators every year, and many people believe this is so that they'll vote against the safety interests of their own constituents. 

Artist Chris Fairbanks decided to share a drawing he'd been working on that illustrates exactly where the balance of power is, and it's upsetting because if you ask me, it's true:

In his remarks about Kelley, Donald trump insisted that all these deaths weren't a gun safety issue at all, saying, “Mental health is your problem here.”

“This isn’t a guns situation,”  he continued, insisting it was the result of a “very deranged individual [with] a lot of problems over a long period of time.”

Funny, he seems to only say that when the shooter is white!

Kelley was a former military man who had a record for domestic violence and was court-martialed in 2012 for assaulting his wife and child. Kelley's history of violence is common amongst mass shooters in America, particularly white men, but domestic violence is often disregarded as a private issue rather than the warning sign it really is.

Trump also wanted to emphasize that a man with a gun stopped Kelley from killing more people, though authorities believe that Kelley may have actually turned his gun on himself. Also:

Hoping someone else with a gun who is a better shot and not killed in an initial attack is not a plan for gun safety. It is demanding that American citizens live in a constant state of war and far—of each other.

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